Very High Resolution Image - IKONOS2, EROS-A1, Quickbird2, Orbview3, SPOT5 - Completely Information about Landsat Satellite Image in the World - facegis.com
Very High Resolution Image

IKONOS, USA

Ikonos - facegis.com

Launched on September 24, 1999, IKONOS is the world's first commercial satellite providing very high resolution (up to 1 m) imagery of the earth. The IKONOS satellite is operated by Space Imaging Inc. of Denver, Colorado, USA. IKONOS simultaneously collects one-meter resolution black-and-white (panchromatic) images and four-meter resolution color (multispectral) images. The multispectral images consist of four bands in the blue, green, red and near-infrared wavelength regions. The multispectral images can be merged with panchromatic images of the same locations to produce "pan-sharpened color" images of 1-m resolution. The satellite camera can distinguish objects on the Earthĺs surface as small as one meter square, but it cannot see individual people. The IKONOS satellite is equipped with state-of-the-art star trackers and on-board GPS, enabling it to acquire imagery with very high positional accuracy. The IKONOS imagery is suitable for applications requiring a high level of details and accuracy, such as mapping, agricultural monitoring, resource management and urban planning.

IKONOS Orbit

Type Sun-Synchronous
Altitude 681 km
Inclination 98.1 deg
Descending node crossing time 10:30 am local solar time
Period 98 min
Off-Nadir Revisit 1.5 to 2.9 days at 40o latitude


Sensor Characteristics

Viewing Angle Agile spacecraft, along track and across track pointing
Swath Width 11 km nominal at nadir
Image Modes Single scene: 13 km x 13 km
Strips: 11 km x 100 km up to 11 km x 1000 km
Image mosaics: up to 12,000 sq. km
Metric Accuracy 12 m horizontal, 10 m vertical without GCP
Radiometric Digitization 11 bits


Spectral Bands wavelength (Ám) Resolution
1 (blue) 0.40 - 0.52 4 m
2 (green) 0.52 - 0.60 4 m
3 (red) 0.63 - 0.69 4 m
4 (NIR) 0.76 - 0.90 4 m
Panchromatic 0.45 - 0.90 1 m

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EROS-A1, Israel

EROS-A1 facegis.com


Launched on 5 December 2000, EROS-A1 is the first of a planned series of commercial high resolution remote sensing satellites from ImageSat International, an international company formed in 1997. The three main shareholders of ImagSat International are, Israel Aircraft Industries, Ltd. (Israel), Electro Optics Industries, Ltd. (Israel), and Core Software Technology (USA). EROS-A1 collects black and white (panchromatic) images at 1.8ám resolution. The nominal swath width is 12.5ákm. The light weight (260 kg) and agile design of the satellite allows it to turn up to 45ádegrees in any direction as it orbits, providing the capability to acquire images of many different areas during the same pass. The satellite's agile ability also allows for stereo imaging during the same orbit. The follow-on satellite, EROS-B will have improved resolution of 0.82ám and swath width of 16ákm.

EROS-A1 Orbit

Type Sun-Synchronous
Descending Node Crossing Time 9:45 am local solar time
Altitude 475 - 491 km
Inclination 97.3 deg
Period 94 min


Sensor Characteristics

Viewing Angle Agile spacecraft
along track and across track pointing
(up to 45o from nadir)
Sensor Type CCD
Ground Sampling Distance 1.8 m
Scanning Asynchronous (up to 750 lines/second)
Radiometric Digitization 11 bits
Spectral Band Panchromatic, 0.5 - 0.9 Ám
Pixels-in-line 7800
Image Modes Basic Scene: 12.6 km x 12.6 km
Monostrips, up to 30o from nadir: Up to 12.6 km x 120 km
Monostrips, up to 43o from nadir: Up to 12.6 km x 217 km
Image Mosaic: 25.2 km x 25.2 km
Stereo Monostrips: Up to 12.6 km x 44 km
Stereo Scenes: 12.6 km x 12.6 km

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QUICKBIRD, USA

Quickbird - facegis.com


Quickbird 2 was successfully launched on 18 Oct 2001

The Quickbird satellites are a series of very high resolution satellites operated by EarthWatch Inc. In September 2001, EarthWatch changed its name to DigitalGlobe. The first of the satellites, Quickbird-1 was launched on 20 Nov 2000, but failed to reach orbit. The second identical satellite, Quickbird-2, is planned to be launched in October 2001. Both satellites were initially planned for 1ám resolution imaging. In December 2000, EarthWatch received a license to operate a 0.5ámeter resolution satellite system. The plans for QuickBird 2 are modified to increase the resolution of the satellite imaging system from the originally planned 1-m resolution to 0.61ám by lowering the orbit in which the satellite will be flown. The panchromatic resolution is increased from 1ám to 0.61 Ám and the multispectral resolution is increased from 4ám to 2.5áÁm.

The Quickbird-2 satellite will simultanelously collect panchromatic images at 0.61ám resolution and multispectral images at 2.5ám resolution. The multispectral images consist of four bands in the blue, green, red and near-infrared wavelength regions. The multispectral images can be merged with panchromatic images of the same locations to produce "pan-sharpened color" images of 0.61 Ám resolution. The satelliteÁs ability to acquire high-resolution imagery will supply users with satellite data at resolutions comparable to aerial photography. Buildings, cars, and even large individual trees can be recognized. Locational information collected by the satelliteÁs star trackers and onboard global positioning system (GPS) will enable users accurate, large-scale mapping without using ground control points (GCPs).

Quickbird-2 Orbit

Type Sun-Synchronous
Altitude 450 km
Inclination 98 deg
Period 93.4 min.
Off-Nadir Revisit 1 to 3.5 days
Field of Regard 544 km swath


Sensor Characteristics

Viewing Angle Agile spacecraft, in-track and cross-track pointing
+/- 30 deg nominal fore-and-aft and side-to-side,
45 deg maximum
Swath Width 17 km nominal at nadir
Image Strip Length Up to 225 km
Metric Accuracy 23 m circular error (CE), 17 m linear error (LE)
at 90% confidence (without ground control points)
Radiometric Digitization 11 bits


Spectral Band Wavelength (Ám) Resolution (at nadir) Resolution (at 30o off nadir)
1 (blue) 0.45 - 0.52 2.5 m 2.9 m
2 (green) 0.52 - 0.60 2.5 m 2.9 m
3 (red) 0.63 - 0.69 2.5 m 2.9 m
4 (NIR) 0.76 - 0.89 2.5 m 2.9 m
Panchromatic 0.45 - 0.90 0.61 m 0.73 m

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ORBVIEW 3, USA

Orbview 3 - facegis.com

OrbImage has planned to launch two 1-m resolution satellites. One of the satellites, OrbView-4 was launched on 21 September 2001, but failed to reach orbit. OrbView-4's camera had a 1-m resolution for panchromatic imaging and a 4-m resolution for multispectral imaging. The satellite also carried a hyperspectral imaging instrument. It would have become the first commercial satellite to produce hyperspectral imagery, and the second satellite to have hyperspectral imaging capability (besides the NASA's experimental EO1 satellite).

OrbView-3 satellite is planned to be launched in 2002. It carries the similar 1-m resolution panchromatic and 4-m resolution multispectral imaging instrument, but without the hyperspectral instrument

Orbview-3 Orbit

Type Sun-Synchronous
Altitude 470 km
Revisit Less than 3 days


Sensor Characteristics

Swath Width 8 km


Spectral Band Wavelength (Ám) Resolution
1 (blue) 0.45 - 0.52 4 m
2 (green) 0.52 - 0.60 4 m
3 (red) 0.625 - 0.695 4 m
4 (NIR) 0.76 - 0.90 4 m
Panchromatic 0.45 - 0.90 1 m

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SPOT 5, France

SOPT 5 France

SPOT 5 is a new satellite of the SPOT family of satellites. It is planned to be launched in the first quarter of 2002. A new High Resolution Geometry or HRG imaging instrument is developed by CNES to be carried on-board SPOT 5. The HRG instrument promises a higher ground resolution than that of the HRV/HRVIR on SPOT 1 - 4 satellites: 5 m, and 2.5 m by interpolation in panchromatic mode, and 10 m in all 3 spectral bands in the visible to near infrared ranges. The spectral band in the short wave infrared band is maintained at a resolution of 20 m due to limitations imposed by the geometry of the CCD sensors used in this band. The field width of HRG is 60 km, same as SPOT 1, 2, 3, & 4. With two HRG instruments, a maximum swath of 120 km at 5 m resolution can be achieved. The oblique viewing capacity is maintained providing rapid access to a given area. A dedicated instrument, High Resolution Stereo (HRS), for along track stereo acquisition will also be carried on board SPOT 5. A VEGETATION large coverage instrument will also be available. To ensure continuity with the SPOT 1 - 4 satellites, the SPOT 5 spectral bands will be the same as those for SPOT 4: B1 (0.50-0.59 Ám); B2 (0.61-0.68 Ám); B3 (0.79-0.89 Ám); and SWIR (1.58-1.75 Ám). The panchromatic band will, however, return to the values used for SPOT 1 through 3 (Pan: 0.51-0.73 Ám).

SPOT 5 will have the same swath (60 km) as SPOT 1 - 4 satellites, but with higher resolution. In order to transmit the increase volume of data within a data rate limit of 100 Mbit/s, data compression techniques will be used while downlinking the data to the ground station. The specifications of SPOT 5 call for a planimetric accuracy of 10ám (rms) and an elevation accuracy of 5 m (rms). These figures are compatible with conventional mapping standards at 1:50 000 scale. The radiometric quality of SPOT 5 imagery will be equal to or better than that of SPOT 4.

SPOT 5 Orbit

SPOT 5 will have the same orbit as SPOT 1 - 4.
Type Sun-Synchronous, 10:30 am (local solar time) descending node crossing
Altitude 832 km
Inclination 98.7 deg
Period 101 min
Repeat Cycle 26 days
Off-Nadir Revisit 1 to 3 days

Sensor Characteristics
Swath Width 60 km
Metric Accuracy 10 m (rms) planimetric, 5 m elevation
Radiometric Digitization 8 bits

Spectral Bands wavelength (Ám) Resolution
1 (green) 0.50 - 0.59 10 m
2 (red) 0.61 - 0.68 10 m
3 (NIR) 0.79 - 0.89 10 m
4 (SWIR) 1.58 - 1.75 20 m
Panchromatic 0.51 - 0.73 5 m (2.5 m by interpolation)

Source : http://www.crisp.nus.edu.sg

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